Wednesday, November 13, 2019

ENTOMOLOGISTS OR BUG CARD COLLECTORS SHOULD BECOME ENTOMOPHAGISTS


If you are interested in bugs, it time that you try eating them. Most of the world eats bugs.
They are very nutritious and will be necessary in the future when meat is not readily available.
 An inexpensive way to try bugs is the Lil Bugz packets as linked below.


For more information on the value and need for eating bugs,. see the link below.




Thursday, October 24, 2019

STRANGEST IN THE WORLD FROM NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC




is the most complete guide to edible insect nutrition I could find. Did you know that among other advantages edible insects help with combating inflammation and is good for your brain?
The above blog will explain just about everything we know about insect nutrition.

Saturday, September 28, 2019

Tuesday, August 27, 2019

THE AMAZING HONEYPOT ANT


Ants are amazing. This is a honeypot ant that is used to store food without spoiling and to feed ants that do not leave the nest. The video below has some extraneous footage but is the best description I could find.

HONEYPOT ANT YOUTUBE VIDEO


FUN BOOK ON WHY WE NEED INSECTS

"In Buzz, Sting, Bite: Why We Need Insects (Simon & Schuster, 2019), Anne Sverdrup-Thygeson comes to the defense of the "tiny critters that all do their little bit to save your life, every single day." A professor of conservation biology at the Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Sverdrup-Thygeson is a lively, witty, and discerning guide through the scientific lore surrounding some of the tiniest—though still very powerful—organisms on Earth."


INTERESTING BUG LINKS

Wednesday, July 31, 2019

CRICKETS & GRASSHOPPERS fOUND TO HAVE FIVE TIMES ANTITOXIDANTS THAN ORANGE JUICE


https://youtu.be/qf5_KmlKj9E

"New research from Frontiers in Nutrition came out that looked at the antioxidant capacity in edible insects compared to orange juice and olive oil. 
Antioxidants, at least from research conducted in the lab, are the chemical molecules that help protect cells in the body by reducing and removing free radicals from damaging those cells.
The exciting results found that crickets, grasshoppers, and silkworms all contained 5X the antioxidant capacity compared to orange juice."
               See article: https://www.cricketflours.com/edible-insect-antioxidants/
To order edible insects and cricket powder: EDIBLEINSECTS.COM

More information: https://twitter.com/BugsForDinner


Tuesday, July 2, 2019

INSECTS AND THEIR EFFECTS ON SOIL

DUNG BEETLE

How important are bugs in healthy soil and what kind are they? Read this scientific article.
https://www.jstor.org/stable/1929431?seq=1#metadata_info_tab_contents

For a good video about bugs in your garden watch this video.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cNW7Ww9eqi8

Monday, May 20, 2019

PEACOCK SPIDER WITH SUPER BLACK SPOTS

https://www.sciencenews.org/article/peacock-spiders-superblack-spots-reflect-just-05-percent-light?utm_source=Editors_Picks&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=editorspicks051919&fbclid=IwAR2WaWKIXTh4EPjXGq714LyUvzWR3ya2UtBwPDCUDd1XPUOnlHZgZlm4TCA

"Male peacock spiders know how to put on a show for potential mates, with dancing and a bit of optical trickery.
Microscopic bumps on the arachnids’ exoskeletons make velvety black areas look darker than a typical black by manipulating light. This architecture reflects less than 0.5 percent of light, researchers report May 15 in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B.
The ultradark spots, found near vivid colors on the spiders’ abdomens, create an “optical illusion that the colors are so bright … they're practically glowing,” says Harvard University evolutionary biologist Dakota McCoy.
Male peacock spiders swing and shake their brilliantly colored abdomens during elaborate mating displays. Pigments produce the red and yellow hues, but blues and purples come from light interacting with hairlike scales (SN: 09/17/16, p. 32).
Black areas on the spiders contain pigment, too. But scanning electron microscopy also revealed a landscape of tiny bumps in superblack patches on Maratus speciosus and M. karrie peacock spiders. In contrast, all-black, closely related Cylistella spiders have a smooth text
ure."
Note for July 1. Link added for recipies   
                 http://bugvivant.com/edible-insect-recipes/         

Tuesday, April 30, 2019

NEW YORK TIMES:INSECT APOCALYPSE ARTICLE



This is an outstanding article that is both good as a warning and an excellent article for amateur entomologists.

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/11/27/magazine/insect-apocalypse.html

A question: Entomophagy (eating bugs) is becoming more widespread and definitely one of the foods for the future as the population increases and climate change gets worse. Will we have to raise bugs (bees) to return into the wild? Will we have to do as we did with seeds (https://www.seedvault.no//) preserve a huge variety of bugs

A good source for edible insects is: www.edibleinsects.com

Monday, March 25, 2019

.INSECT DECIMATION UPSTAGES GLOBAL WARMING


"For the immediate future, the Paris Accord is riding the wrong horse, as global warming is a long-term project compared to the insect catastrophe happening right now! Where else is found 40% to 90% species devastation?"


link to article in Counterpunch

And an Article From the New York Times:

The Insect Apocalypse Is Here

Because insects are legion, inconspicuous and hard to meaningfully track, the fear that there might be far fewer than before was more felt than documented. People noticed it by canals or in backyards or under streetlights at night — familiar places that had become unfamiliarly empty. The feeling was so common that entomologists developed a shorthand for it, named for the way many people first began to notice that they weren’t seeing as many bugs. They called it the windshield phenomenon.


Tuesday, February 26, 2019

HOUR GLASS SPIDER FOUND IN CHINA BY FARMER



"This spider is one of the earliest spiders documented in China. It was rediscovered in 2000 in the country’s Sichuan Province. It has only been seen six other times since 2000. Li said that the spider is highly valued for scientific research and is an extremely rare species in Sichuan. Li himself has spent a lot of time trying to find a specimen but has never found one."
http://www.heroviral.com/chinese-hourglass-spider/2/
___________________________________________________________________

IMPORTANT PAPER PUT OUT BY UN ENVIRONMENT

Abstract

Insects make up about half of all known living organisms. They play key roles in, pollination, nutrient cycling, food chains of birds and other insectivores, and are one of the pillars of our ecosystems. However, the wide use of insecticides, fragmentation of habitats and climate change are placing multiple threats on them and their populations are under sharp decline. This Foresight Brief explores insect services, threats and solutions to sustain insect populations.

Monday, February 18, 2019

THE BRAHMIN MOTH FROM CATERPLLER TO MOTH


"Imagine a scenario where a scary Tim Burton movie came true. Suddenly, the things in your scariest dreams are spontaneously generating on Earth. There are beasts running about, and skeleton-white creatures singing in the rain, and look, now it is raining hair–It seems like the brahmin caterpillar was born from such a scenario.
Although they are not harmful to you in any way, they look like terrors that were sent to plague the rest of the animal kingdom. Just have look at this thing! From the wackadoo head headgear to the black and pointed tail, it seems that they were geared for destruction. In reality, they are just kindly caterpillars; they do little more than eat and metamorphose into beautiful looking moths.
From the family of insects called Brahmaidae, it’s hard to imagine why such a bizarre looking thing exists, or what possible reason it has to look like this in its caterpillar stage. Some believe that the spindles on their heads help them blend in with the twigs and small branches found of foliage.  Certainly, when they are moths, they are perfectly camouflaged for trees. Also, once they turn into moths, they have a wingspan that can reach up to 20cm (just over 7 inches)."
https://futurism.com/3-of-the-most-nightmarish-caterpillars-youll-ever-encounter

Monday, January 21, 2019

Scientist Brad Lister returned to Puerto Rican rainforest after 35 years to find 98% of ground insects had vanished



https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2019/jan/15/insect-collapse-we-are-destroying-our-life-
support-systems

 "His return to the Luquillo rainforest in Puerto Rico after 35 years was to reveal an appalling discovery. The insect population that once provided plentiful food for birds throughout the mountainous national park had collapsed. On the ground, 98% had gone. Up in the leafy canopy, 80% had vanished. The most likely culprit by far is global warming.

Earth’s bugs outweigh humans 17 times over and are such a fundamental foundation of the food chain that scientists say a crash in insect numbers risks “ecological Armageddon”. When Lister’s study was published in October, one expert called the findings “hyper-alarming”.

Sunday, January 20, 2019

LANDSCAPE DETERMINES WILD BEE SPECIES AND ABUNDACE AND DIVERSITY



This is another study pointing out the importance of preserving our natural environment. Monoculture and deforestation severely reduce the variety and population of our insects.


A good source of information on entomology and entomophagy is Ento Nation - https://entonation.com/category/entomology/

The source for edible insects is -https://www.edibleinsects.com/

Friday, January 11, 2019